Attention! All audio files can be found here.

Monarch Butterflies: Up, Up, and Away

Monarch Butterflies: Up, Up, and Away

Regular price $18.99 Sale

By Marta Magellan

Monarch butterflies are the celebrities of the insect world. You probably know about their famous transformation from caterpillar to butterfly. But what else do you know about them? Are monarchs endangered? Why are there imposters out there imitating them? How do they manage their incredible two-way flights? And what’s up with those Florida monarchs?

Why don’t they behave like the others? The answers may surprise you.


Available in Spring 2024. Pre-order here to receive pre-release copies!

What folks are saying:

"A strong, engaging work that delivers intriguing facts about monarch butterflies." Kirkus Review

Full Kirkus Review:

This science-focused illustrated children’s book explores the incredible life cycles of multigenerational monarch butterflies.

Monarchs are common and loved in North America, but “What makes them the celebrities of the insect world?” the narrator asks. Ending most two-page spreads on a question, the work features a narrator who guides readers through an understanding of monarch migration, the geography behind their long journeys, and the strange life cycles that allow every “third or fourth” generation of monarchs to live for months, rather than only a few weeks, of adulthood. But when habitats change, how can monarchs survive? Marta Magellan addresses many of the concerns that migrating butterflies face, such as chemicals, habitat loss, climate change, and the parasites that have affected resident monarchs. But the book ends on a hopeful note, showing young readers how to become citizen scientists and plant their own pollinator gardens. Images of monarch mimics, along with why these look-alikes share similar coloration, will help young readers identify insect specimens in their own neighborhoods. A helpful glossary explains many of the more challenging science vocabulary words in the book, and even offers further information about different types of mimicry beyond the main text. Some word choices, especially in the end pages, may stymie beginning readers, for example in the discussion of systemic pesticides. While the book has a hefty amount of text, it’s skillfully presented in the pages, with plenty of eye-catching images to move the story along. The bright, clear photographs (by Gersing, Lambert, Mazur, and Endrizzi) are perfectly accompanied by Mauro Magellan’s illustrations, which blend photorealism with design elements. A detailed map shows the butterflies’ migration paths, a feature that will captivate adult and young readers alike. But the final image may haunt readers with its depiction of fallen butterflies, crumpled on a sidewalk. The Magellans, a sibling team, and their collaborators wisely follow that scene with ways young readers can help.

A strong, engaging work that delivers intriguing facts about monarch butterflies."


 

Additional acclaimed books by Marta Magellan:

Amazing, Misunderstood Bats

Reviews:

San Francisco Book Review:

"As an author of a variety of pieces of non-fiction literature for children, Marta Magellan sets out to debunk the historic myths and clear misconceptions about the creatures we call bats. Despite their usefulness in cutting down the world’s supply of pesky bugs and their extraordinary ability to pollinate plants and help in the efforts of regrowing depleted forestry, many perceive bats to be disease-striken, blood-sucking, eerie creatures who hang out in dark and dreary places waiting to attack. Magellan supplies an ample amount of unique and fascinating facts about Chiropteras with hopes of changing the viewpoints of those most skeptical. She informs her readers that bats are, in fact, the world’s best pollinators over long distances and that some of these creatures can eat as many as 1,000 bugs in an hour. The world would certainly be more bug-infested without them. She also notes that one of the most feared among bats, the vampire bat, may be of significant help in treating blood clots, a potentially life-threatening condition that occurs in humans. Their saliva is a hundred times more potent than the current medications used to treat this ailment. It successfully destroys the clot without adversely effecting anything else in the blood. While some bats do carry diseases, foxes, dogs, and raccoons are more likely to pass rabies on to humans than are bats. They become paralyzed when infected with this devastating disease, thus rendering them much less a risk to humans. Magellan concludes with urging her readers to help protect the habitats of these incredible creatures, so they can continue to be of great benefit to the human population.

This extraordinary work of non-fiction captures the essence of what these small, but remarkable creatures can do. Amazing, Misunderstood Bats contains a plethora of interesting and original knowledge about bats. It’s effectively convincing and a far cry from being dry and encyclopedia-like. Graphic, vibrant pictures accentuate the text, and an array of boxes filled with fun facts are included that help break up the flow of the words throughout the book. Additionally, a glossary and index are provided to aid in clarifying unfamiliar vocabulary, as well as to offer guidance in finding specific topics. The striking photographs throughout will likely capture the attention of children as young as five or six and as old as nine or ten. While the younger audience may enjoy learning some of the fun facts; the older ones are more likely to bask in the details and overall content of the text. Elementary school science teachers may find this book a useful resource for their classrooms, and it’s ideal for libraries in both public and private elementary schools to shelve or display. The overall quality is great, and the content is truly exceptional." 


Amazon Review: 

"As an author of a variety of pieces of non-fiction literature for children, Marta Magellan sets out to debunk the historic myths and clear misconceptions about the creatures we call bats. Despite their usefulness in cutting down the world’s supply of pesky bugs and their extraordinary ability to pollinate plants and help in the efforts of regrowing depleted forestry, many perceive bats to be disease-striken, blood-sucking, eerie creatures who hang out in dark and dreary places waiting to attack. Magellan supplies an ample amount of unique and fascinating facts about Chiropteras with hopes of changing the viewpoints of those most skeptical. She informs her readers that bats are, in fact, the world’s best pollinators over long distances and that some of these creatures can eat as many as 1,000 bugs in an hour. The world would certainly be more bug-infested without them. She also notes that one of the most feared among bats, the vampire bat, may be of significant help in treating blood clots, a potentially life-threatening condition that occurs in humans. Their saliva is a hundred times more potent than the current medications used to treat this ailment. It successfully destroys the clot without adversely effecting anything else in the blood. While some bats do carry diseases, foxes, dogs, and raccoons are more likely to pass rabies on to humans than are bats. They become paralyzed when infected with this devastating disease, thus rendering them much less a risk to humans. Magellan concludes with urging her readers to help protect the habitats of these incredible creatures, so they can continue to be of great benefit to the human population.

This extraordinary work of non-fiction captures the essence of what these small, but remarkable creatures can do. Amazing, Misunderstood Bats contains a plethora of interesting and original knowledge about bats. It’s effectively convincing and a far cry from being dry and encyclopedia-like. Graphic, vibrant pictures accentuate the text, and an array of boxes filled with fun facts are included that help break up the flow of the words throughout the book. Additionally, a glossary and index are provided to aid in clarifying unfamiliar vocabulary, as well as to offer guidance in finding specific topics. The striking photographs throughout will likely capture the attention of children as young as five or six and as old as nine or ten. While the younger audience may enjoy learning some of the fun facts; the older ones are more likely to bask in the details and overall content of the text. Elementary school science teachers may find this book a useful resource for their classrooms, and it’s ideal for libraries in both public and private elementary schools to shelve or display. The overall quality is great, and the content is truly exceptional." ~Jenn

"This is a great read for any curious child. The pictures are INCREDIBLE and will keep kids (and adults) wanting to read it again and again. The text is straight forward and gives everyone new reasons to love bats and appreciate the niche they fill in the environment. This book also provides an opportunity to turn a Halloween staple into a learning moment. Even adults will likely pick up a few intriguing facts." ~Wikki Kawczyk



Books by Marta Magellan